Tagged: Sleep Review

Remedē Shows Sustained Safety & Efficacy Through 5 Years 0

Remedē Shows Sustained Safety & Efficacy Through 5 Years

Five-year results from the remedē System Post Approval Study were presented at late-breaking sessions at two international scientific conferences, Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) 2020 and CHEST 2020. Marketed by Respicardia, the remedē System was approved to treat moderate to severe central sleep apnea (CSA) in adult patients by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2017. The newly released data assesses the safety and efficacy of transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation for CSA.

The remedē System is an implantable device that activates automatically each night to stimulate phrenic nerve in the chest, which sends signals to the diaphragm to help restore a normal breathing pattern. The Post Approval Study followed patients from the pivotal trial through 5 years post implant.

“Since the initial trials, transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation has proven to be effective and safe in treating moderate to severe central sleep apnea. Demonstrating sustained benefit through five years is very significant for patients with this disease. The sustained benefit of the therapy is critically important for heart failure patients, whose disease is chronic and progressive.” says …

5 Oft-Misunderstood Signs of Poor Sleep in Children 0

5 Oft-Misunderstood Signs of Poor Sleep in Children

As it turns out, many people have misunderstood certain health signs in children for years.

For example, we often think of dark circles under a child’s eyes as a symptom of poor sleep, but they might actually be part of a cause of sleep disturbances, according to Walter Castro, MD, a pediatric pulmonologist and sleep specialist at Banner Children’s, part of nonprofit Banner Health, in a release.

“Those dark circles can sometimes be ‘allergic shiners’ caused by allergies,” Castro says. “Experts can determine this by examining the child’s nose for inflammation. This is one of several misunderstood aspects of sleep-related issues in children that parents are often surprised to learn.”

[RELATED: Linking Allergies and Sleep Quality, Researchers Find REM-RDI To Be Underutilized Sleep Parameter ]

To help in wading through the confusion of myths and facts, here are five signs of poor sleep in children:

  1. Morning headaches. These can be a symptom of sleep apnea, caused by retention of carbon dioxide during sleep.
  2. Hyperactivity. While daytime sleepiness is an obvious sign of poor sleep, hyperactivity and a lack of impulse
This Simple Blood Test Can Help Predict Cardiometabolic Disease Risk in OSA Patients 0

This Simple Blood Test Can Help Predict Cardiometabolic Disease Risk in OSA Patients

New research finds that testing for an inflammatory marker is a stronger predictor than apnea-hypopnea index alone.

By Lisa Spear

It’s no secret that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can lead to hypertension and other cardiometabolic diseases, but predicting who will go on to develop these conditions is not always straightforward.

New research from Penn State University suggests that a simple blood test can shed light on which patients may eventually experience these comorbidities. C-reactive protein (CRP), a general inflammatory marker easily obtained from a blood sample, could give clinicians a window into an OSA patient’s future metabolic health with more precision than current diagnostic tools, according to research published in the journal Physiological Reports.

The study compared the inflammatory biomarker CRP with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) in identifying the presence and severity of hypertension and hyperglycemia in middle-aged adults with mild to moderate OSA. The study showed CRP to be a stronger predictor of elevated blood pressure and fasting glucose levels than AHI alone.

If sleep clinicians incorporate regular CRP testing into their clinical practice, they could offer …

After Two Decades, 73-Year-Old Finds Sleep Apnea Therapy That Works for Him 0

After Two Decades, 73-Year-Old Finds Sleep Apnea Therapy That Works for Him

After more than 20 years of troubled sleep, Dwight Johnson can finally sleep peacefully throughout the night. He’s a side sleeper who says he couldn’t find a CPAP mask that would stay sealed well enough throughout the night. Now he’s one of a small but growing number of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients who are turning to neurostimulators.

Johnson, 73, recently was treated at Banner Desert Medical Center for obstructive sleep apnea using Inspire Upper Airway Stimulation, a small device implanted in his body that works while he sleeps. He clicks a small remote to turn it on, and Inspire applies gentle stimulation to open key airway muscles during sleep.

[RELATED: Inspire Medical Systems Answers Questions About Its Upper Airway Stimulation Therapy for OSA]

“I’d wake up every 15 or 20 minutes some nights, and some nights every hour” for the past two decades,” says Johnson of Eloy, Ariz, in a release. “Now I’m sleeping much, much better. It’s phenomenal. You wake up in the morning and feel refreshed, as opposed to being tired and dragging.”

Inspire is placed …

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked to Poor COVID-19 Outcomes 0

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked to Poor COVID-19 Outcomes

Patients with obstructive sleep apnea could have an increased risk for adverse COVID-19 outcomes, according to a systematic review published in Sleep Medicine Reviews.

However, researchers said more studies are needed to determine whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor or “simply a comorbidity that is associated with COVID-19 morbidity and mortality.”

The researchers found that OSA shares risk factors and comorbidities associated with negative COVID-19 outcomes, including obesity, hypertension, diabetes and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. They cited the recent CORONADO study that revealed patients with OSA who were hospitalized for COVID-19 had an increased risk for mortality on day 7 of admission (OR = 2.80). The researchers also found “plausible mechanisms” for OSA to independently increase a patient’s risk for morbidity and mortality, including obesity — which may worsen hypoxemia and cytokine storm worse — and low vitamin D levels.

Get the full story at sleepreview.com.

from Sleep Review https://www.sleepreviewmag.com/sleep-health/obstructive-sleep-apnea-poor-covid-19-outcomes/…

SomnoMed Launches SomnoDent Herbst Advance Elite PDAC-Verified Oral Appliance 0

SomnoMed Launches SomnoDent Herbst Advance Elite PDAC-Verified Oral Appliance

SomnoMed introduces the SomnoDent Herbst Advance Elite, a PDAC-verified milled oral appliance for the treatment of mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea. The SomnoDent Herbst Advance Elite is SomnoMed’s strongest PDAC-verified appliance with 18% greater flexural strength (from pre-cured polymethyl methacrylate). The BFlex soft liner, designed for enhanced patient comfort, comes standard on every Herbst Advance Elite. The device has a 3-year “no questions asked” replacement plan.

from Sleep Review https://www.sleepreviewmag.com/sleep-treatments/therapy-devices/oral-appliances/somnomed-somnodent-herbst-advance-elite/…

This May Improve Central Sleep Apnea in Pacing-induced Cardiomyopathy 0

This May Improve Central Sleep Apnea in Pacing-induced Cardiomyopathy

Central sleep apnea was common in patients with pacing-induced cardiomyopathy and may improve with cardiac resynchronization therapy compared with right ventricular pacing, researchers found in the UPGRADE trial.

“The main findings are new, as pacing-induced cardiomyopathy is so far poorly studied,” Wolfgang Dichtl, MD, PhD, assistant medical director of University Clinic of Internal Medicine III at Medical University Innsbruck in Austria, told Healio. “In fact, this is the first published work showing the positive effects of upgrading to CRT concerning structural improvement (increase in left ventricular ejection fraction and decrease in left ventricular systolic volumes) and decrease in biomarkers (N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide plasma levels) in a randomized trial.”

In the randomized controlled, prospective trial published in The American Journal of Cardiology, Fabian Barbieri, MD, clinical cardiologist at Medical University Innsbruck in Austria, and researchers analyzed data from 54 patients (median age, 75 years; 80% men) with pacing-induced cardiomyopathy who underwent LV lead implantation within the past month.

Get the full story at healio.com.

from Sleep Review https://www.sleepreviewmag.com/sleep-disorders/breathing-disorders/central-sleep-apnea/this-may-improve-central-sleep-apnea-in-pacing-induced-cardiomyopathy/…

A Measurement That Might Predict the Tonsillectomy Patients with OSA Who Need Postoperative Oxygen 0

A Measurement That Might Predict the Tonsillectomy Patients with OSA Who Need Postoperative Oxygen

An abstract recently presented at ANESTHESIOLOGY 2020 finds that Masimo ORi (oxygen reserve index) could predict whether children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome undergoing tonsillectomy required postoperative oxygen therapy. ANESTHESIOLOGY is the annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.

ORi, available outside the United States, is a noninvasive and continuous parameter intended to provide insight into a patient’s oxygen status during moderate hyperoxia. Enabled by the multi-wavelength rainbow Pulse CO-Oximetry platform, ORi is provided alongside oxygen saturation (SpO2), a Masimo SET pulse oximetry measurement.

In the retrospective study, Yoshimi Inagaki, MD, PhD, and colleagues at Tottori University in Yonago, Japan, sought to determine whether Masimo ORi could serve as a useful predictor of the need for postoperative oxygen therapy (POT). They enrolled 45 pediatric patients with obstructive sleep apnea, ranging from 7 to 120 months, who were anesthetized with sevoflurane and monitored with ORi while undergoing tonsillectomy.

[RELATED: Do Sleep Studies Predict Who Benefits from Adenotonsillectomy? Maybe Not]

Of the 45 patients, 16 required postoperative oxygen therapy. For those 16, the mean lowest ORi and SpO2

SleepImage Integrates American Heart Association Science to Move Cardiovascular Health Forward 0

SleepImage Integrates American Heart Association Science to Move Cardiovascular Health Forward

SleepImage joins the American Heart Association’s Center for Health Technology & Innovation’s Innovators’ Network, which is focused on building and fostering health tech relationships to develop innovative and scalable solutions. SleepImage is a technology company offering FDA-cleared cloud-based software as a medical device based on analyzing data collected with a single sensor to evaluate sleep quality and diagnose and manage sleep disorders.

“It is a milestone for SleepImage to join the American Heart Association’s Center for Health Technology & Innovation’s Network at a time when public health is under pressure and healthcare systems are looking for ways to improve outcomes at reduced cost,” says Bogi Palsson, CEO of SleepImage, in a release.

[RELATED: Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Has Grave Consequences for Heart Health]

Patrick Wayte, senior vice president of the American Heart Association’s Center for Health Technology & Innovation, says in a release, “The Center aims to expand usage of the association’s science-based CarePlans, so it’s incredibly encouraging to see SleepImage leveraging best-in-class science from the American Heart Association with the aim of improving health education and engagement.”

Preliminary findings …

Which Insomnia Patients Might Be at Increased Risk of Dementia? 0

Which Insomnia Patients Might Be at Increased Risk of Dementia?

Middle-aged adults who report symptoms of insomnia and are sleeping less than six hours a night may be at increased risk of cognitive impairment, according to a study by Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The results may help health care professionals understand which patients who report insomnia are at increased risk for developing dementia.

Insomnia is characterized by reports of difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking up too early and not being able to get back to sleep. When these symptoms occur at least 3 nights a week and for at least 3 months, it is considered a chronic disorder. Researchers found that adults who reported insomnia and obtained less than six hours of measured sleep in the laboratory were two times more likely to have cognitive impairment than people with the same insomnia complaints who got six or more hours of sleep in the lab. The study results were published in the journal SLEEP on September 24.

According to Julio Fernandez-Mendoza, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral health and sleep specialist at Penn State Health …